Baptisms

 

Having baby baptised

 

 

 Arranging the baptism of your child at St. Mary of the Angels is simple: just speak to the parish priest after one of the Sunday Masses.

 If this is your first child, you will be expected to attend two sessions of preparation. These are primarily intended for the Catholic parent(s), but parents of other Churches, faiths or none are also welcome. Normally the parish priest will first pay you a visit at home to fill in a form and arrange the dates of the preparation and of the baptism itself.

 

If you have previously had a baby baptised and attended preparation sessions, you do not need to repeat them, and it will be simply a question of arranging the date and giving details of the child’s name, your own details and names of godparents.

 

We expect you to attend Mass regularly with your child(ren), as baptism includes a solemn promise to do your best to bring your child up as a Catholic. We realise this can often be difficult, but even though your children may not yet understand what is going in Mass, it is an absolute foundation for their spiritual life which cannot be replaced by anything else.

 

We are very tolerant of crying children during Mass at St. Mary of the Angels. If the crying is persistent or obviously disturbing to those around, you are recommended to take them to the entrance of the Church until they have calmed down.

 

Baptisms are normally performed every 3-4 weeks on a Sunday afternoon at 2pm. Because of high demand, we cannot normally perform individual baptisms. We do not take bookings for baptisms by phone or email, only in person by a parent after Sunday Mass.

 

We also welcome older children for baptism: depending on their age they may themselves need some preparation.

 

Godparents must be practising Catholics over the age of 16. The minimum requirement is one godparent, who can be of either sex. A Christian of another Church can act as a witness, which is similar to a godparent but not exactly the same. You can choose as many godparents as you wish, but we are unable to register more than three in the baptism register and on your child’s certificate.

 

Fr. Keith's homily for Sunday 9 July

July 13th, 2017

Fr. Cantalamessa, who for many years was the preacher to the Pope and his household,  tells an amusing story from his childhood when after Sunday Mass people from the village would walk home with each other, and on reaching someone’s home it was customary for the person to invite others in to have lunch. But it was a purely formal invitation: you were expected politely to decline and say your wife was expecting you with food on the table. If you had said, “Yes, I’d be delighted,” the person who [Read more]

Fr. Keith's Homily for Sunday 2 July

July 7th, 2017

One of the most wonderful stories to emerge from the Second World War was that of Viktor Frankl, a Jewish psychologist who was imprisoned in a concentration camp for several years. In the midst of the unbelievable oppression the prisoners suffered, which led many of them to mental breakdown, suicide or death from sheer exhaustion, he suddenly had a kind of revelation. He came to see that there is an inner core of freedom in everyone’s heart which cannot be touched even by the worst kind of cruel[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for Pentecost Sunday

June 9th, 2017

As we come up to the General Election this week we have once more got used to the amus-ing spectacle of politicians being asked searching questions by journalists and very often giving answers to a completely different question, the one they would have preferred to be asked, as it gives them the opportunity to stress the positive points in their policies and avoid the awkward questions. And today as we celebrate the great feast of Pentecost, the climax of the Easter season and the birthday o[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for Divine Mercy Sunday

April 28th, 2017

When St. Faustina first saw the picture of Jesus which he had commanded her to have painted, she burst into tears complaining that it was nothing like as beautiful as the vision of Jesus she had seen when he spoke to her. Jesus himself had to reassure her that it was not the artistic beauty of the picture that counted, but the grace that he would impart to those who venerated it. And in fact when he first began appearing to this very ordinary and uneducated nun in the 1930s, the very first thing[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homilies for Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday

April 17th, 2017

Easter “In another world it may be different, but in this world, to live is to change and to be perfect is to have changed often.” These famous words of Cardinal Newman seem especially relevant to this time of year. Not only is the world of nature changing around us almost every day, waking up from its winter slumber, but in the Church too we once again make the transition from Lent, with its focus on self-denial, to Holy Week, when we meditate on Christ’s passion and death, and finally now to [Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for Palm Sunday

April 13th, 2017

In the Narnia stories by C.S. Lewis, brought to the cinema as ‘The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,’ when the children are told that the ruler of Narnia is a lion, Aslan, they are un-derstandably rather alarmed. “Is he safe? Has he been tamed?” they ask. “No, he is wild and dangerous,” is the reply. “But he is good, very good.” It could be a perfect description of Jesus and what it was like to be in his company as one of his disciples. Scarcely a comfortable ride. You never quite knew what h[Read more]

Fr. Keith's Homily for the Fifth Sunday of Lent

April 7th, 2017

When Jesus feeds the 5000 people with five loaves and two pieces of fish there is a sequel we are told about which is at the same time amusing, sad and instructive. The people who have been fed try to force him to become their king, because they see in him a source of free food. Understandable, perhaps, in people living with great poverty, but also a big mistake. What is that mistake? St. Paul explains it clearly in today’s second reading: they are inter-ested only in what is unspiritual, or[Read more]

HOLY WEEK AND EASTER

March 30th, 2017

A sheet is available at the back of Church for you to take away with these details. Please remember there is no Mass on Easter Sunday evening. There is a Penitential Service on the Wednesday evening of Holy Week and extra Confession times. The Easter Vigil is a little later this year. Sunday 9 April PALM SUNDAY Masses with Blessing of Palms at the usual times: at 9.30am Procession starting from St. Mary of the Angels School at 9.20am Monday 10 April Mass 10am Tuesday 11 April Mass 10am 1[Read more]

Fr. Keith's Homily for the Fourth Sunday of Lent

March 30th, 2017

Human beings seem to have an inbuilt attraction for secrets. We love to keep secrets and then reveal them to those we love, and we like the idea that there is something only we and a few chosen others know, but which most people haven’t got a clue about. Some people take this to an extreme by indulging in conspiracy theories about what is really going on behind the news headlines - a secret plot, perhaps, to kidnap the Pope and put someone else in his place, or who was really responsible for the[Read more]

Videos of Fr. Keith's Talks on Apparitions

March 24th, 2017

To view these videos, click on the links below Third Talk: First Part: www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVlPnt3hih8 Second Part: www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEwaKaHd1sk Previous talks: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLq_6HaZxooWenUbHpC5URFchq8HUKxeAt[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for the Third Sunday of Lent

March 24th, 2017

One of the founders of psychotherapy Carl Jung, was once asked to see a young woman of Jewish origin who was suffering from severe neurotic symptoms. Sh had been to see several psychiatrists but none was able to help her. Jung began by asking her about her family background and early life and could find no cause for her neurosis. Then, as he sometimes did, he asked, “Tell me about your grandparents.” Softly the woman began to weep as she recalled how her grandfather, who was a Rabbi, took her on[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for the Second Sunday of Lent

March 17th, 2017

C.S. Lewis once said that if we could for a moment see our neighbour as they will be after their death, we would either fall down in awe before them, as they would be a glorified be-ing in heaven, or shrink with horror from one consigned to hell. Lewis was, of course, a master of the imagination, with his powerful stories such as the Narnia series, the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, which appeal both to children and adults, and his saying illustrates the power of what we see with our eyes, or[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for Sunday 9 July

July 13th, 2017

Fr. Cantalamessa, who for many years was the preacher to the Pope and his household,  tells an amusing story from his childhood when after Sunday Mass people from the village would walk home with each other, and on reaching someone’s home it was customary for the person to invite others in to have lunch. But it was a purely formal invitation: you were expected politely to decline and say your wife was expecting you with food on the table. If you had said, “Yes, I’d be delighted,” the person who [Read more]

Fr. Keith's Homily for Sunday 2 July

July 7th, 2017

One of the most wonderful stories to emerge from the Second World War was that of Viktor Frankl, a Jewish psychologist who was imprisoned in a concentration camp for several years. In the midst of the unbelievable oppression the prisoners suffered, which led many of them to mental breakdown, suicide or death from sheer exhaustion, he suddenly had a kind of revelation. He came to see that there is an inner core of freedom in everyone’s heart which cannot be touched even by the worst kind of cruel[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for Pentecost Sunday

June 9th, 2017

As we come up to the General Election this week we have once more got used to the amus-ing spectacle of politicians being asked searching questions by journalists and very often giving answers to a completely different question, the one they would have preferred to be asked, as it gives them the opportunity to stress the positive points in their policies and avoid the awkward questions. And today as we celebrate the great feast of Pentecost, the climax of the Easter season and the birthday o[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for Divine Mercy Sunday

April 28th, 2017

When St. Faustina first saw the picture of Jesus which he had commanded her to have painted, she burst into tears complaining that it was nothing like as beautiful as the vision of Jesus she had seen when he spoke to her. Jesus himself had to reassure her that it was not the artistic beauty of the picture that counted, but the grace that he would impart to those who venerated it. And in fact when he first began appearing to this very ordinary and uneducated nun in the 1930s, the very first thing[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homilies for Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday

April 17th, 2017

Easter “In another world it may be different, but in this world, to live is to change and to be perfect is to have changed often.” These famous words of Cardinal Newman seem especially relevant to this time of year. Not only is the world of nature changing around us almost every day, waking up from its winter slumber, but in the Church too we once again make the transition from Lent, with its focus on self-denial, to Holy Week, when we meditate on Christ’s passion and death, and finally now to [Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for Palm Sunday

April 13th, 2017

In the Narnia stories by C.S. Lewis, brought to the cinema as ‘The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,’ when the children are told that the ruler of Narnia is a lion, Aslan, they are un-derstandably rather alarmed. “Is he safe? Has he been tamed?” they ask. “No, he is wild and dangerous,” is the reply. “But he is good, very good.” It could be a perfect description of Jesus and what it was like to be in his company as one of his disciples. Scarcely a comfortable ride. You never quite knew what h[Read more]

Fr. Keith's Homily for the Fifth Sunday of Lent

April 7th, 2017

When Jesus feeds the 5000 people with five loaves and two pieces of fish there is a sequel we are told about which is at the same time amusing, sad and instructive. The people who have been fed try to force him to become their king, because they see in him a source of free food. Understandable, perhaps, in people living with great poverty, but also a big mistake. What is that mistake? St. Paul explains it clearly in today’s second reading: they are inter-ested only in what is unspiritual, or[Read more]

HOLY WEEK AND EASTER

March 30th, 2017

A sheet is available at the back of Church for you to take away with these details. Please remember there is no Mass on Easter Sunday evening. There is a Penitential Service on the Wednesday evening of Holy Week and extra Confession times. The Easter Vigil is a little later this year. Sunday 9 April PALM SUNDAY Masses with Blessing of Palms at the usual times: at 9.30am Procession starting from St. Mary of the Angels School at 9.20am Monday 10 April Mass 10am Tuesday 11 April Mass 10am 1[Read more]

Fr. Keith's Homily for the Fourth Sunday of Lent

March 30th, 2017

Human beings seem to have an inbuilt attraction for secrets. We love to keep secrets and then reveal them to those we love, and we like the idea that there is something only we and a few chosen others know, but which most people haven’t got a clue about. Some people take this to an extreme by indulging in conspiracy theories about what is really going on behind the news headlines - a secret plot, perhaps, to kidnap the Pope and put someone else in his place, or who was really responsible for the[Read more]

Videos of Fr. Keith's Talks on Apparitions

March 24th, 2017

To view these videos, click on the links below Third Talk: First Part: www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVlPnt3hih8 Second Part: www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEwaKaHd1sk Previous talks: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLq_6HaZxooWenUbHpC5URFchq8HUKxeAt[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for the Third Sunday of Lent

March 24th, 2017

One of the founders of psychotherapy Carl Jung, was once asked to see a young woman of Jewish origin who was suffering from severe neurotic symptoms. Sh had been to see several psychiatrists but none was able to help her. Jung began by asking her about her family background and early life and could find no cause for her neurosis. Then, as he sometimes did, he asked, “Tell me about your grandparents.” Softly the woman began to weep as she recalled how her grandfather, who was a Rabbi, took her on[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for the Second Sunday of Lent

March 17th, 2017

C.S. Lewis once said that if we could for a moment see our neighbour as they will be after their death, we would either fall down in awe before them, as they would be a glorified be-ing in heaven, or shrink with horror from one consigned to hell. Lewis was, of course, a master of the imagination, with his powerful stories such as the Narnia series, the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, which appeal both to children and adults, and his saying illustrates the power of what we see with our eyes, or[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for Sunday 9 July

July 13th, 2017

Fr. Cantalamessa, who for many years was the preacher to the Pope and his household,  tells an amusing story from his childhood when after Sunday Mass people from the village would walk home with each other, and on reaching someone’s home it was customary for the person to invite others in to have lunch. But it was a purely formal invitation: you were expected politely to decline and say your wife was expecting you with food on the table. If you had said, “Yes, I’d be delighted,” the person who [Read more]

Fr. Keith's Homily for Sunday 2 July

July 7th, 2017

One of the most wonderful stories to emerge from the Second World War was that of Viktor Frankl, a Jewish psychologist who was imprisoned in a concentration camp for several years. In the midst of the unbelievable oppression the prisoners suffered, which led many of them to mental breakdown, suicide or death from sheer exhaustion, he suddenly had a kind of revelation. He came to see that there is an inner core of freedom in everyone’s heart which cannot be touched even by the worst kind of cruel[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for Pentecost Sunday

June 9th, 2017

As we come up to the General Election this week we have once more got used to the amus-ing spectacle of politicians being asked searching questions by journalists and very often giving answers to a completely different question, the one they would have preferred to be asked, as it gives them the opportunity to stress the positive points in their policies and avoid the awkward questions. And today as we celebrate the great feast of Pentecost, the climax of the Easter season and the birthday o[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for Divine Mercy Sunday

April 28th, 2017

When St. Faustina first saw the picture of Jesus which he had commanded her to have painted, she burst into tears complaining that it was nothing like as beautiful as the vision of Jesus she had seen when he spoke to her. Jesus himself had to reassure her that it was not the artistic beauty of the picture that counted, but the grace that he would impart to those who venerated it. And in fact when he first began appearing to this very ordinary and uneducated nun in the 1930s, the very first thing[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homilies for Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday

April 17th, 2017

Easter “In another world it may be different, but in this world, to live is to change and to be perfect is to have changed often.” These famous words of Cardinal Newman seem especially relevant to this time of year. Not only is the world of nature changing around us almost every day, waking up from its winter slumber, but in the Church too we once again make the transition from Lent, with its focus on self-denial, to Holy Week, when we meditate on Christ’s passion and death, and finally now to [Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for Palm Sunday

April 13th, 2017

In the Narnia stories by C.S. Lewis, brought to the cinema as ‘The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,’ when the children are told that the ruler of Narnia is a lion, Aslan, they are un-derstandably rather alarmed. “Is he safe? Has he been tamed?” they ask. “No, he is wild and dangerous,” is the reply. “But he is good, very good.” It could be a perfect description of Jesus and what it was like to be in his company as one of his disciples. Scarcely a comfortable ride. You never quite knew what h[Read more]

Fr. Keith's Homily for the Fifth Sunday of Lent

April 7th, 2017

When Jesus feeds the 5000 people with five loaves and two pieces of fish there is a sequel we are told about which is at the same time amusing, sad and instructive. The people who have been fed try to force him to become their king, because they see in him a source of free food. Understandable, perhaps, in people living with great poverty, but also a big mistake. What is that mistake? St. Paul explains it clearly in today’s second reading: they are inter-ested only in what is unspiritual, or[Read more]

HOLY WEEK AND EASTER

March 30th, 2017

A sheet is available at the back of Church for you to take away with these details. Please remember there is no Mass on Easter Sunday evening. There is a Penitential Service on the Wednesday evening of Holy Week and extra Confession times. The Easter Vigil is a little later this year. Sunday 9 April PALM SUNDAY Masses with Blessing of Palms at the usual times: at 9.30am Procession starting from St. Mary of the Angels School at 9.20am Monday 10 April Mass 10am Tuesday 11 April Mass 10am 1[Read more]

Fr. Keith's Homily for the Fourth Sunday of Lent

March 30th, 2017

Human beings seem to have an inbuilt attraction for secrets. We love to keep secrets and then reveal them to those we love, and we like the idea that there is something only we and a few chosen others know, but which most people haven’t got a clue about. Some people take this to an extreme by indulging in conspiracy theories about what is really going on behind the news headlines - a secret plot, perhaps, to kidnap the Pope and put someone else in his place, or who was really responsible for the[Read more]

Videos of Fr. Keith's Talks on Apparitions

March 24th, 2017

To view these videos, click on the links below Third Talk: First Part: www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVlPnt3hih8 Second Part: www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEwaKaHd1sk Previous talks: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLq_6HaZxooWenUbHpC5URFchq8HUKxeAt[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for the Third Sunday of Lent

March 24th, 2017

One of the founders of psychotherapy Carl Jung, was once asked to see a young woman of Jewish origin who was suffering from severe neurotic symptoms. Sh had been to see several psychiatrists but none was able to help her. Jung began by asking her about her family background and early life and could find no cause for her neurosis. Then, as he sometimes did, he asked, “Tell me about your grandparents.” Softly the woman began to weep as she recalled how her grandfather, who was a Rabbi, took her on[Read more]

Fr. Keith's homily for the Second Sunday of Lent

March 17th, 2017

C.S. Lewis once said that if we could for a moment see our neighbour as they will be after their death, we would either fall down in awe before them, as they would be a glorified be-ing in heaven, or shrink with horror from one consigned to hell. Lewis was, of course, a master of the imagination, with his powerful stories such as the Narnia series, the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, which appeal both to children and adults, and his saying illustrates the power of what we see with our eyes, or[Read more]

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